IMOO 100!!!!!! FUNDRAISING CONCERT!

We’re very excited to announce IMOO 100, on May 4th, 2014 at Umi Café (610 Somerset St W)

Please join us for a super special fundraising concert featuring some of our most stalwart supporters. Music starts at 7:15 SHARP! $10 / PWYC / More is always welcome.

There might even be cake!  Maybe!

Concert program:

Duo (in which the IMOO kingpin and the benevolent leader speak of things to come, and maybe even play a little!):

Linsey Wellman,
Craig Pedersen

Accordion Conspiracy + 1:

Bernard Stepien, saxophone, accordion
David Broscoe, reeds
Scott Warren, drums,

Radar:

Linsey Wellman, alto saxophone, bass clarinet
Rory Magill, drums
Jennifer Giles, piano

Intermission!

Trio:

David Jackson, guitar
Ian Birse, electronics
Laura Kavanaugh, electronics

Duo:

Craig Pedersen, trumpet
Mark Molnar, cello

And Everyone Together!

IMOO #98, 99

April 6: #98 – Sobol/Magill/Wellman

  • Linsey Wellman – solo saxophone (1st set)
  • Rory Magill – drums, percussion
  • John Sobol – saxophone

April 27: #99 – Allison Cameron Band

  • Allison Cameron – banjo, casio sax, electronics, harmonica, compositions
  • Eric Chenaux – acoustic and electric guitars, pedal steel, harmonica
  • Stephen Parkinson – electric guitar, harmonica, electronics

Chenaux and Parkinson are both self-taught guitar players coming out of different rock music traditions (70’s British blues and 80/90’s punk) while Cameron is an amateur banjo player. Eric Chenaux has made a name for himself as both player and composer in a variety of Toronto groups ranging from alternative folk, alt. jazz and free improvisation. Parkinson and Cameron are also improvisers and composers.

This trio (based in Toronto, Canada) explores the combined talents and varied musical backgrounds of Eric Chenaux, Stephen Parkinson and Allison Cameron. The group began playing in the winter of 2007 working on Allison Cameron’s compositions based on traditional folk music. Some of the music borrows tablature notation from traditional English folk tunes in a non-conformist manner, using re-tuned guitars and banjo, new rhythm, free rhythm and sometimes no rhythm to re-invent and create new pieces out of the old work. Similar to the definition of a palimpsest: a manuscript on which two or more successive texts have been written, each one being erased to make room for the next with the earlier writing incompletely erased and often legible. The group combines approaches to composition and improvisation often found in rock and jazz bands with that of contemporary music composition. The pieces encompass a variety of instruments using guitars in different tunings, electronics, and harmonicas.

IMOO #94, 95

February 2: #94 – Bernard Stepien and John Higney – solos

Bernard Stepien – saxophone
John Higney – guitar, electronics

Here are a few words about Bernard’s set: Canadian Spaces

Bernard Stepien has always been attracted by world music solo players, usually street musicians, wherever he was travelling, from the Chinese Erhu players, the Turkish Aşiks, the Senegalese Kora players, the arabic Ud players, the French accordion players or the Inuit ayaya singers. These musicians play music that is usually based on tonal systems that are radically different from anything we know in the western world’s music. Some use few notes with distant intervals, complex asymmetric rhythms, some are highly cyclical or repetitive, other are based on lengthy unpredictable improvisations.

Over the last few decades, Stepien has been composing short pieces based on these world music sources. For some obscure reasons most of them were composed during the winter with the unmistakable white background. Although they are always white, Canadian winters are never the same from year to year. Some years, frost or snow come early, other have lots of rain and finally the great ones are the ones you can’t even see your neighbours anymore until spring arrives. Others came in the summer, mostly while enjoying great national parks in and around Ottawa. The unmistakable Pink Lake is among them.

Once a composition established, the next thing is to improvise on it. Here, the teachings of Cecil Taylor with whom Stepien has studied in 2001 come to help. Extracting the possible phrases one can do with only 4 or 5 notes and project them in all directions is the secret here.

This solo concert will occur only during the first set of the usual two sets format of IMOO concerts. The second set will also be a solo performance by the great Ottawa guitarist John Higney.

February 16: #95 – Mark Molnar and Bennett Bedoukian

  • Mark Molnar – cello, electronics
  • Bennett Bedoukian – drums, vocals, electronics

IMOO #93

January 19: #93 – Charbonneau/Warren/Wellmanwarrencharbonneauwellman crowPhilippe Charbonneau – bass
Scott Warren – drums, tape loops
Linsey Wellman – bass clarinet, saxophone

Some Ottawa regulars return to play at IMOO together for the first time since IMOO #2!

IMOO #92

December 15: #92 – A Very Ayler Christmas!

disc front(300dpi)

Join us for our third annual Christmas concert under the direction of saxophonist Bernard Stepien.

Bernard Stepien – saxophone
David Broscoe – saxophone
Philippe Charbonneau – bass
Scott Warren – drums, tape loops
Linsey Wellman – saxophone, bass clarinet

IMOO #89, 90

November 24, 2013: #89 – Ken Aldcroft’s Convergence Ensemble – cd release: Saskatoon

ken aldcroft

 

  • Ken Aldcroft- guitar
  • Karen Ng- alto saxophone
  • Nicole Rampersaud- trumpet
  • Scott Thomson- trombone
  • Wes Neal- bass
  • Joe Sorbara- drums

Saxophonist Paul Newman will be playing a solo saxophone set as an opener.

This six-piece group, featuring the instrumentation of a fairly conventional modern jazz ensemble, is the primary conduit for Ken Aldcroft’s compositional and conceptual work. In performance, a set list serves less as a road map for the execution of Ken’s varied and dynamic pieces and more like a menu of possibilities; the group’s members can, individually or collectively, spontaneously arrange any of the available material. Employing a system of aural and gestural cues, the group playfully and creatively reshapes each piece in the spirit of free improvisation, the approach that underpins the ensemble’s composite musical experience. The current personnel of the Convergence Ensemble is the result of the amalgamation of various Aldcroft ensembles of and, with numerous recordings and national tours under their collective belt, the sextet is a thoroughly cohesive musical unit. Each player is as dynamic a soloist on his or her instrument as they come not only in Toronto’s lively creative music scene, but Canada-wide as well. Saskatoon is their fifth CD release, all on the Trio Records and Production label: Sneaky Pete-Slugs’ (2012) Our Hospitality (2009), Trolleys (2008) and The Great Divide (2006).

 

December 1, 2013: #90 – Fire Moss

  • David Parker – double bass, electronics
  • K. L. Sealegs – synthesizers, pedals

live improvisational soundscapes, blending elements of synthetic drones, melodic dirges and freaked-out noise.

October 27: IMOO #88 – Essoudry/Wellman

October 27, 2013: #88 – Mike Essoudry and Linsey Wellman

Mike+Linsey

  • Mike Essoudry – drums, clarinet
  • Linsey Wellman – reeds

Also without Essoudrys make a Herzensbrecherin such as Jerome tender rattle and Glöckchenpercussion and Wellmans of spicy Reedton seductively at the taste buds and caps to create itself. They blow and strew bloom dust and spices of the Orient in the brain and produce hallucinations loaded by camel caravans, with oranges and Datteln. The place, to which the fantasy is carried forward, lies in the Mesopotamia, if also not the material today. RK Mashu and Uruk just like shame-has + Enkidu and Uta Napishti to set itself on the traces of Gilgamesh. The Sopranosax sinks itself in arabesque conference area, with Parekeresken trills with talks trifishes. The clay/tone becomes sometimes so rau and serious, as it requires the longing, and pretty often so beautifully that one would like itself to throw into the sand. The Gilgamesh cycle The Gadfly Suite follows, those with Shostakovichs Ol. together, and with County fair a freejazziger trip has 97 only the names on a folk festival without bustles and besoffenes people.

Rigobert Dittmann in Bad Alchemy (by way of Babelfish)